Blog 695: Close, But No Biscuit – Star Wars – Part 2

The handful of lines about midichlorians singlehandedly destroyed the power and the mystery of the Force, turning subtle mysticism into hard science. Both have their place in different franchises, yes, but we like Star Wars for its subtle mysticism.

Let us discuss the ill-fated but pivotal character Anakin Skywalker and how he (child acting aside) is brutally mishanded by the narrative of the prequel trilogy.

No transcripts this time, just some additional thoughts in the post.

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Blog 694: Quake 4 Is Not a Bad Game

I’m actually a bit late to playing Quake 4. See, ever since I first bought it, replays have been oddly coincident with Simply Red and/or Mick Hucknall having a new song out. I’m not a fan of Simply Red and/or Mick Hucknall by any means, but I generally play games with the radio on in the background and… this kept happening.

I say I’m late because Simply Red had a single out over the summer, but I didn’t replay Quake 4. It must have planted some seeds though, because here I am now with that Quake 4 feeling in my guts. Come on, then.

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Blog 693: Close, But No Biscuit – Star Wars – Part 1

Star Wars, oh Star Wars. It was my life; the original trilogy and selected bits of the Expanded Universe were everything to me growing up. The space-ships, the subtle mysticism, the ancient ruins and technological marvels mixed just so to create a wonderous, exciting universe of adventure.

Alas, while the disappointing scab of the prequel trilogy has mostly healed by now, to the point where I can actually appreciate some parts of them with a degree of clarity, the wound torn open by The Force Awakens is still raw.

But let’s not get started at the end. Let’s begin at the beginning, even though it’s not the real beginning. Let us discuss Episode I: The Phantom Menace.

No transcripts this time, just some additional thoughts in the post.

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Blog 692: The Little Things

Recently I made the sword-wielding characters of my game unable to attack while moving. Previously, attacks felt somehow meaningless — floaty, weightless, they just sort-of happened. Now that they stop you from moving, they feel somehow more important, more visceral.

It seems like a tiny thing. One little flag inside the attack system setup, plugged into the movement code and… Bang. It feels like a real game.

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